Not much in the way of happenings today so I figured I’d jump in the time machine and go back a couple years in which a whole lotta not much was going on May 15, 2004:

Susan and I finally got up around 10 a.m. (love having nothing to do on a lazy Saturday morning), and we drove over to a do-it-yourself store called Stock on San Fernando Road to pick up the custom screen door she’d ordered.

On the way, we yielded for a very long funeral procession that backed traffic up on Fletcher something severe, and left patiences tried and the occasional horns honking. I finally gave up waiting for the stream of funeral cars to pass and made a left onto Riverside up to Glendale Boulevard and over to San Fernando.

We picked up the door with only a few minutes to spare before they closed (what DIY place closes at noon — on a Saturday?!) , and I was unimpressed with the service or the people. Susan had been promised the necessary hinge and handle hardware, but none was included and since it didn’t state that on the invoice, the clerk just shrugged his shoulders and said sorry. We left, figuring she could pick up whatever she wanted at Baller’s on Hyperion.

We had a late breakfast at Algemac’s then headed over to Susan’s to drop off the screen. She was very wary about me not seeing my birthday present and made me wait out front while she put the door inside. I pleaded if I could at least cast eyes upon the box, and she finally allowed me in, only after covering it up with a blanket.

It’s huge!

I also got to meet her upstairs tenant, Joe, and a neighbor from across the street, Ralph. Nice folks all.

Leaving Susan at her place I headed back home — totally forgetting to pick up cat litter (dammit!) — and just chilled playing the very cool Red Dead Revolver on my Playstation2 before getting cleaned-up to go pick Susan up so that we could head into North Hollywood to see a play that a coworker’s husband is in called Spike Heels, with both the the show and her husband James Castle Stevens getting a great review in Backstage West — and deservedly so.

Stevens and his role as a sleazy yet ultimately likeable lawyer were tailor-made for each other. He is brilliantly funny, elevating the already good play whenever he’s onstage.